These days, you can literally have anyone marry you. All they need is a certificate from some random website and, boom, your best friend or brother can marry you. In fact, my little brother officiated my wedding, and it was one of the best choices we could have made. He got his marriage certificate from an online site, and because he knew us better than any random officiant, he was the perfect choice. 

But is it the right choice for you? Should you have an official marry you, or a best friend, or a family member? 

According to TheKnot.com:

Lots of couples are choosing to have a close friend or relative officiate their nuptials, and we love the idea. Not only does it add an even more personal spin to your ceremony, but it's another way to incorporate a loved one into your wedding who's not in the wedding party. Your officiant should be someone you care about (and who cares about you), and whom you trust to make your ceremony special. Just remember that ordination requirements differ from state to state—you'll want to do your research first to make sure you're following local state or district rules.

According to Brides.com:

Many couples will want to work with their officiant to write the ceremony script, and one of the benefits of having a friend perform the wedding is the ability to highly personalize the ceremony. But don't get too carried away with the reminiscing and forget about the legal requirements. In Seattle, for example, a marriage is not recognized legally unless the couple declares during the ceremony that they take each other to be spouses. Once again, work with your local marriage-governing bureau to determine requirements for your area.

According to TheSpruce.com:

Many couples will want to work with their officiant to write the ceremony script, and one of the benefits of having a friend perform the wedding is the ability to highly personalize the ceremony. But don't get too carried away with the reminiscing and forget about the legal requirements. In Seattle, for example, a marriage is not recognized legally unless the couple declares during the ceremony that they take each other to be spouses. Once again, work with your local marriage-governing bureau to determine requirements for your area.

And finally, The Washington Post for the officiant:

4. Email the couple’s friends and family members for inspiration.  If you’re being asked to officiate, you probably know the couple well, but that’s only one view of them. Ask others who are close to them for funny anecdotes, nostalgic tidbits and inspiration. Officiating a wedding can mean a lot of pressure to say something wise and meaningful about marriage, but I found that just getting a few stories from folks who are dear to the couple made it so much easier. A few conversation starters: How do you know the couple? What are your favorite memories of them? What do they love about each other? What are their favorite qualities (and pet peeves) about each other? What, in your eyes, makes them click? What do they as a couple bring to the world?

There are so many reasons to have a friend or family member marry you, but the choice is ultimately up to you!